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Sidney (Algernon)

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called by Thomson, in his Summer, “The British Cassius,” because of his republican principles. Both disliked kings, not from their misrule, but from a dislike to monarchy. Cassius was one of the conspirators against the life of Cæsar, and Sidney was one of the judges that condemned Charles I. to the block (1617–1683).

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Siccis pedibus [with dry feet]
Sice
Sicilian Dishes (Sicŭlæ dapēs)
Sicilian Vespers
Sick Man (The)
Sick as a Cat
Sick as a Dog
Sick as a Horse
Siddons (Mrs.)
Side of the Angels
Sidney (Algernon)
Sidney (Sir Philip)
Sidney-Sussex College
Siegfried
Sieglind
Sienna
Sierra
Siesta
Sieve and Shears
Sif
Sight

Linking here:

Dying Sayings
Roman (The)

See Also:

Sidney