- skip - Brewer’s

Silbury

,

near Marlborough. An artificial mound, 130 feet high, and covering seven acres of ground. Some say it is where “King Sel” was buried; others, that it is a corruption of Solis-bury (mound of the sun); others, that it is Sel-barrow (great tumulus), in honour of some ancient prince of Britain. The Rev. A. C. Smith is of opinion that it was erected by the Celts about B.C. 1600. There is a natural hill in the same vicinity, called St. Martin’s Sell or Sill, in which case sill or sell means seat or throne. These etymologies of Silbury must rest on the authority of those who have suggested them.

previous entry · index · next entry

ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ

Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

previous entry · index · next entry

Sif
Sight
Sight (Far)
Sign your Name
Signs instead of words
Significavit
Siguna
Sigurd
Sikes (Bill)
Sikh
Silbury
Silchester (Berks)
Silence gives Consent
Silent (The)
Silenus
Silhouette
Silk
Silk Gown
Silk Purse
Silken Thread
Silly is the German selig (blessed)