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Slewed

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Intoxicated When a vessel changes her tack, she staggers and gradually heels over. A drunken man moves like a ship changing her angle of sailing. (Probably from the Icelandic, snua, turn.)

“Mr. Hornby was just a bit slewed by the liquor heʹd taken.”—W. C. Russell: A Strange Voyage, chap. xii. p. 25.

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Sleepless Hat (A)
Sleepy Hollow
Sleeve
Sleeve of Care
Sleeve of Hildebrand (The)
Sleeveless Errand
Sleight of Hand
Sleipnir
Slender
Sleuth-Hound
Slewed
Slick (Sam)
Slick Off
Sliding Scale
Slip
Slippers
Slipshod
Slipslop
Sloane MSS
Slogan
Slop (Dr.)