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Socʹrates

.

The greatest of the ancient philosophers, whose chief aim was to amend the morals of his countrymen, the Atheʹnians. Cicero said of him that “he brought down philosophy from the heavens to earth;” and he was certainly the first to teach that “the proper study of mankind is man.” Socrates resisted the unjust sentence of the senate, which condemned to death the Athenian generals for not burying the dead at the battle of Arginu’sæ.

“Socratēs—


Who, firmly good in a corrupted state,

Against the rage of tyrants single stood

Invincible.”


Thomson: Winter.

Socrates used to call himself “the midwife of men’s thoughts.” Out of his intellectual school sprang those of Plato and the Dialectic system; Euclid and the Megaric; Aristippos and the Cyrenaʹic, Antisʹthenes and the Cynic.

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Soapy Sam
Sober or Sobrius
Sober as a Judge—i.e. grave and sedate
Sobrino (in Orlando Furioso)
Sobriquet (French)
Socialism
Société de Momus
Society
Sock [comedy]
Sock a Corpse (To)
Socrates
Sodom
Soffarides
Soft
Soft Sawder
Soft Soap
Soft as Soap
Soft Fire makes Sweet Malt (A)
Soft Words Butter no Parsnips
Softly
Softy

Linking here:

Dying Sayings
Summum Bonum
Wives of Literary Men

See Also:

Socrates