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Swashbuckler

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A ruffian; a swaggerer. “From swashing,” says Fuller, “and making a noise on the buckler.” The sword-players used to “swash” or tap their shield, as fencers tap their foot upon the ground when they attack. (Worthies of England.) (A.D. 1662.) (See Swinge-buckler.)

“A bravo, a swashbuckler, one that for money and good cheere will follow any man to defend him; but if any danger come, he runs away the first, and leaves him in the lurch.”—Florio.

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Swan
Swan-hopping
Swan of Avon (The), or Sweet Swan of Avon
Swan of Cambray (The)
Swan of Mantua (The), or The Mantuan Swan
Swan of Meander (The)
Swan of Padua (The)
Swans … Geese
Swanimote
Swarga
Swashbuckler
Swear
Swear Black is White (To)
Swear by my Sword (Hamlet, i. 5)
Sweat
Sweating Sickness
Swedenborgians
Swedish Nightingale
Sweep
Sweepstakes (A)
Sweet as sugar

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