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Ursa Minor

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Also called Cynosuʹra, or “Dog’s tail,” from its circular sweep. The pole star is a in the tail. (See Cynosure.)

St. Ursula and the eleven thousand virgin martyrs. Ursula was a British princess, and, as the legend says, was going to France with her virgin train, but was driven by adverse winds to Cologne, where she and her 11,000 companions were martyred by the Huns. This extravagant legend is said to have originated in the discovery of an inscription to Ursula et Undecimilla Virgines, “the virgins Ursula and Undecimilla;” but by translating the latter name, the inscription reads “Ursula and her 11,000 virgins.” Visitors to Cologne are shown piles of skulls and human bones heaped in the wall, faced with glass, which the verger asserts are the relics of the 11,000 martyred virgins. (See Virgins.)

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Urda or Urdan Fount (The)
Urda, Verdandi, and Skulda
Urgan
Urganda la Desconecida
Urgel
Uriah
Uriel
Urim
Urim and Thummim
Ursa Major
Ursa Minor
Used Up
Usher means a porter
Usquebaugh
Ut
Ut Queat Laxis, etc
Uta
Uter
Uterine
Utgard (Old Norse, outer ward)
Utgard-Lok

See Also:

Ursa Minor