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Worms

,

in Germany, according to tradition, is so called from the Lindwurm or dragon slain by Siegfried under the linden tree.

“Yet more I know of Siegfried that well your your ear may hold.

Beneath the linden tree he slew the dragon bold;

Then in its blood he bathed him, which turned to horn his skin,

So now no weapon harms him, as oft hath proven been.”


Nibelungen, st. 104.

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Worcester (Woost-er)
Worcester College (Oxford)
Word
Word (The)
Word to the Wise (A)
Words
Working on the Dead Horse
World
World (The)
Worm
Worms
Wormwood
Worse than a Crime
Worship
Worsted
Worth
Worthies (The Nine)
Wound
Wraith
Wrangler
Wrath’s Hole (Cornwall)

See Also:

Worms