Academy

Academy, a public shady park or place of groves near Athens, where Plato taught his philosophy and whence his school derived its name, of which there are three branches, the Old, the Middle, and the New, represented respectively by Plato himself, Arcesilaos, and Carneades. The French Academy, of forty members, was founded by Richelieu in 1635, and is charged with the interests of the French language and literature, and in particular with the duty of compiling an authoritative dictionary of the French language. Besides these, there are in France other four with a like limited membership in the interest of other departments of science and art, all now associated in the Institute of France, which consists in all of 229 members. There are similar institutions in other states of Europe, all of greater or less note.

Definition taken from The Nuttall Encyclopædia, edited by the Reverend James Wood (1907)

Acacia * Acadia
Abu
Ab`ubekr
Ab`u-klea
A`bul-faraj
Abul-fazel
Abul-feda
Abu-Tha`leb
Aby`dos
Abyssin`ia
Acacia
Academy
Acadia
Acanthus
Acapul`co
Acarna`nia
Acca`dians
Acca-Laurentia
Acciaioli
Accolade
Accol`ti
Accor`so

Nearby

Academy in Brewer’s Dictionary of Phrase & Fable

Links here from Chalmers

Achard, Anthony
Adanson, Michel
Aleander, Jerome [No. 3]
Alembert, John Le Rond D'
Almeida, Theodore
Amontons, William
Anderson, George [No. 3]
Anderson, John
Anselme, Antony
Arcere, Louis Etienne
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