Aquinas, Thomas (12261274)

Aquinas, Thomas, the Angelic Doctor, or Doctor of the Schools, an Italian of noble birth, studied at Naples, became a Dominican monk despite the opposition of his parents, sat at the feet of Albertus Magnus, and went with him to Paris, was known among his pupils as the “Dumb Ox,” from his stubborn silence at study, prelected at his Alma Mater and elsewhere with distinguished success, and being invited to assist the Council at Lyons, fell sick and died. His “Summa Theologiæ,” the greatest of his many works, is a masterly production, and to this day of standard authority in the Romish Church. His writings, which fill 17 folio vols., along with those of Duns Scotus, his rival, constitute the high-water mark of scholastic philosophy and the watershed of its divergence into the philosophico-speculative thought on the one hand, and the ethico-practical or realism of modern times on the other, q.v. (12261274).

Definition taken from The Nuttall Encyclopædia, edited by the Reverend James Wood (1907)

Aquileia * Aquitaine`
Apule`ius
Apu`lia
Apu`re
Aqua Tofa`na
Aqua`rius
Aquaviva
A`quila
A`quila
A`quila, Gaspar
Aquileia
Aquinas, Thomas
Aquitaine`
Arabella Stuart
Arabesque
Ara`bi, Ahmed Pasha
Arabia
Arabia Felix
Arabian Desert
Arabian Nights
Arabs, The
Aracan