Bede

Bede, or Beda, surnamed “The Venerable,” an English monk and ecclesiastical historian, born at Monkwearmouth, in the abbey of which, together with that of Jarrow, he spent his life, devoted to quiet study and learning; his writings numerous, in the shape of commentaries, biographies, and philosophical treatises; his most important work, the “Ecclesiastical History” of England, written in Latin, and translated by Alfred the Great; completed a translation of John's Gospel the day he died. An old monk, it is said, wrote this epitaph over his grave, Hac sunt in fossâ Bedæ ... ossa, “In this pit are the bones ... of Beda,” and then fell asleep; but when he awoke he found some invisible hand had inserted venerabilis in the blank which he had failed to fill up, whence Bede's epinomen it is alleged.

Definition taken from The Nuttall Encyclopædia, edited by the Reverend James Wood (1907)

Beddoes, Thomas Lovell * Bedell
Becker, Nicolaus
Becker, William Adolphe
Becket, Thomas a
Beckford, William
Beckmann
Beckx, Peter John
Becquerel, Antoine Cæsar
Bed of Justice
Bedchamber, Lords
Beddoes, Thomas Lovell
Bede
Bedell
Bedford
Bedford, John, Duke of
Bedford Level
Bedlam
Bedmar, Marquis de
Bedouins
Bee, The
Beecher, Henry Ward
Beecher-Stowe, Harriet Elizabeth

Nearby

Bede in Brewer’s Dictionary of Phrase & Fable

Links here from Chalmers

Abelard, Peter
Acca, St.
Adamanus
Aidan
Alban, St.
Alcuinus, Flaccus
Aldhelm, St.
Amphibalus
Arator
Augustine
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