Colorado

Colorado (Colora`do) , an inland State of the American Union, traversed by the Rocky Mountains, and watered by the upper reaches of the S. Platte and Arkansas Rivers, is twice as large as England. The mountains are the highest in the States (13,000 to 14,000 ft.), are traversed by lofty passes through which the railways run, have rich spacious valleys or parks among them, and have great deposits of gold, silver, lead, and iron. There are also extensive coal-beds; hence the leading industries are mining and iron working. The eastern portion is a level, treeless plain, adapted for grazing. Agriculture, carried on with irrigation, suffers from insect plagues like the Colorado potato beetle. The climate is dry and clear, and attracts invalids. Acquired partly from France in 1804, and the rest from Mexico in 1848; the territory was organised in 1861, and admitted to the Union in 1876. The capital is Denver (107). There is a small Spanish-speaking population in the S.

Population (circa 1900) given as 412,000.

Definition taken from The Nuttall Encyclopædia, edited by the Reverend James Wood (1907)

Colophon * Colossæ
Cologne
Cologne, The Three Kings of
Colombia
Colombo
Colon
Colonna
Colonna, Victoria
Colonne, Edouard
Colonus
Colophon
Colora`do
Colossæ
Colossians, The Epistle to the
Colossus
Colot
Colour-blindness
Colour-sergeant
Colquhoun, John
Colston, Edward
Colt, Samuel
Columba, St.

Nearby

Colorado in Brewer’s Dictionary of Phrase & Fable