Crœsus

Crœsus, the last of the kings of Lydia, in the 6th century B.C.; celebrated for his wealth, so that his name became a synonym for a man overwhelmed by the favours of fortune; being visited by Solon, he asked him one day if he knew any one happier than he was, when the sage answered, “No man can be counted happy till after death.” Of the truth of this Croesus had ere long experience; being condemned to death by Cyrus, who had defeated him and condemned him to be burnt, and about to be led to the burning pile, he called out thrice over the name of Solon; when Cyrus, having learned the reason, moved with pity, ordered his release, retained him among his counsellors, and commended him when dying to the care of his son.

Definition taken from The Nuttall Encyclopædia, edited by the Reverend James Wood (1907)

Crockett, Samuel Rutherford * Croker, John Wilson
Crillon
Crimea
Crimean War
Crinan Canal
Crispi, Francesco
Crispin
Critias
Criton
Croa`tia and Slavonia
Crockett, Samuel Rutherford
Crœsus
Croker, John Wilson
Croker, T. Crofton
Croll, James
Croly, George
Cromarty
Crome, John
Crompton, Samuel
Cromwell, Oliver
Cromwell, Richard
Cromwell, Thomas

Nearby

Crœsus in Brewer’s Dictionary of Phrase & Fable

Links here from Chalmers

Anacharsis
Anderson, Walter
Aristeas [No. 3]