Demosthenes

Demosthenes, the great Athenian orator, born in Athens; had many impediments to overcome to succeed in the profession, but by ingenious methods and indomitable perseverance he subdued them all, and became the first orator not of Greece only, but of all antiquity; a stammer in his speech he overcame by practising with pebbles in his mouth, and a natural diffidence by declaiming on the sea-beach amid the noise of the waves; while he acquired a perfect mastery of the Greek language by binding himself down to copy five times over in succession Thucydides' “History of the Peloponnesian War”; he employed 15 years of his life in denunciation of Philip of Macedon, who was bent on subjugating his country; pronounced against him his immortal “Philippics” and “Olynthiacs”; took part in the battle of Cheronea, and continued the struggle even after Philip's death; on the death of Alexander he gave his services as an orator to the confederated Greeks, and in the end made away with himself by poison so as not to fall into the hands of Autipater (385-322 B.C.). See Ctesiphon.

Definition taken from The Nuttall Encyclopædia, edited by the Reverend James Wood (1907)

De Morgan, Augustus * Dempster, Thomas
Demiurgus
Democracy
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Democritus
Democritus Junior
Demogeot
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Demoivre, Abraham
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De Morgan, Augustus
Demosthenes
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Denarius
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Denham, Sir John
Denina, Carlo
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