Ecclesiastes

Ecclesiastes (i.e. the Preacher), a book of the Old Testament, questionably ascribed to Solomon, and now deemed of more recent date as belonging to a period when the reflective spirit prevailed; and it is written apparently in depreciation of mere reflection as a stepping-stone to wisdom. The standpoint of the author is a religious one; the data on which he rests is given in experience, and his object is to expose the vanity of every source of satisfaction which is not founded on the fear, and has not supreme regard for the commandments, of God, a doctrine which is the very ground-principle of the Jewish faith; but if vanity is written over the whole field of human experience, he argues, this is not the fault of the system of things, but due, according to the author, to the folly of man (chap. vii. 29).

Definition taken from The Nuttall Encyclopædia, edited by the Reverend James Wood (1907)

Ecclefechan * Ecclesiastical Polity, the Law of
Ebers, George Moritz
Ebert, Karl Egon
Ebionites
Eblis
Ebony
Ebro
Ecbatana
Ecce Homo
Ecchymosis
Ecclefechan
Ecclesiastes
Ecclesiastical Polity, the Law of
Ecclesiastical States
Ecclesiasticus
Ecclesiology
Ecgberht
Echidna
Echo
Eck, John
Eckermann, Johann Peter
Eckhart, Meister

Nearby

Ecclesiastes in Brewer’s Dictionary of Phrase & Fable

Links here from Chalmers

Acacius, Luscus
Alexander, John
Bray, Thomas
Cartwright, Thomas
Corranus, Anthony
Donatus, Ælius
Drant, Thomas
Duport, James
Durell, David
Erasmus, Desiderius
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