Ecclesiasticus

Ecclesiasticus, one of the books of the Apocrypha, ascribed to Jesus, the son of Sirach, admitted to the sacred canon by the Council of Trent, though excluded by the Jews. It contains a body of wise maxims, in imitation, as regards matter as well as form, of the Proverbs of Solomon, and an appendix on the men who were the disciples of wisdom. Its general aim, as has been said, is “to represent wisdom as the source of all virtue and blessedness, and by warnings, admonitions, and promises to encourage in the pursuit of it.” It was originally written in Hebrew, but is now extant only in a Greek translation executed in Egypt, professedly by the author's grandson.

Definition taken from The Nuttall Encyclopædia, edited by the Reverend James Wood (1907)

Ecclesiastical States * Ecclesiology
Eblis
Ebony
Ebro
Ecbatana
Ecce Homo
Ecchymosis
Ecclefechan
Ecclesiastes
Ecclesiastical Polity, the Law of
Ecclesiastical States
Ecclesiasticus
Ecclesiology
Ecgberht
Echidna
Echo
Eck, John
Eckermann, Johann Peter
Eckhart, Meister
Eckmühl
Eclectics
Ecliptic

Nearby

Ecclesiasticus in Brewer’s Dictionary of Phrase & Fable

Links here from Chalmers

Arnald, Richard
Cave, William
Chandler, Edward
Clerc, John Le
Dalrymple, David
Jansenius, Cornelius
Rainolds, John
Spenser, Edmund