Epigram

Epigram, in modern usage, is a neat, witty, and pointed utterance briefly couched in verse form, usually satiric, and reserving its sting to the last line; sometimes made the vehicle of a quaintly-turned compliment, as, for example, in Pope's couplet to Chesterfield, when asked to write something with that nobleman's pencil;—

“Accept a miracle; instead of wit,

See two dull lines by Stanhope's pencil writ.”

The Latin epigrammatists, especially Martial and Catullus, were the first to give a satirical turn to the epigram, their predecessors the Greeks having employed it merely for purposes of epitaph and monumental inscriptions of a laudatory nature.

Definition taken from The Nuttall Encyclopædia, edited by the Reverend James Wood (1907)

Epigoni * Epilepsy
Epic melody
Epicharis
Epicharmus
Epictetus
Epicureans
Epicurus
Epicycle
Epidaurus
Epidemic
Epigoni
Epigram
Epilepsy
Epimenides
Epimetheus
Epinal
Epinay, Madame d'
Epiphanius, St.
Epiphany
Epi`rus
Episcopacy
Episcopius, Simon

Nearby

Epigram in Brewer’s Dictionary of Phrase & Fable

Links here from Chalmers

Agrippa, Henry Cornelius
Jones, Inigo
Owen, John
Ralegh, Sir Walter
Whitehead, David