Inns of Court

Inns of Court, are four voluntary societies—Lincoln's Inn, the Inner and the Middle Temple, and Gray's Inn—with whom rests the exclusive right to call men to the English bar; they provide lectures and hold examinations in law, and they have discretionary powers to refuse admission to the bar or to expel and disqualify persons of unsuitable character from it; each Inn possesses considerable property, a dining hall, library, and chapel, and is subject to the jurisdiction of an irresponsible, self-elective body of Benchers, who are usually judges or senior counsel; these societies originated in the 13th century, when the practice of law passed out of the hands of the clergy.

Definition taken from The Nuttall Encyclopædia, edited by the Reverend James Wood (1907)

Innocents, The Holy, Feast of * Innsbruck
Ingulph
Inkermann
Inner Temple
Innes, Cosmo
Innes, Thomas (Father Innes)
Innisfail
Innocent
Innocent III.
Innocent XI.
Innocents, The Holy, Feast of
Inns of Court
Innsbruck
Ino
Inoculation
Inquisition
Insanity
Inspiration
Inspiration of the Scriptures
Inspired Idiot
Institute of France
Institutes of the Christian Religion

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Abingdon, Willoughby Bertie
Ireland, Samuel
Selden, John