Inquisition

Inquisition, an ecclesiastical tribunal established in 1248 under Pope Innocent IV., and set up successively in Italy, Spain, Germany, and the S. of France, for the trial and punishment of heretics, of which that established in Spain achieved the greatest notoriety from the number of victims it sacrificed, and the remorseless tortures to which they were subjected, both when under examination to extort confession and after conviction. The rigour of its action began to abate in the 17th century, but it was not till 1835, after frequent attempts to limit its power and suppress it, that it was abolished in Spain. Napoleon suppressed it in France in 1808, and after an attempted revival from 1814 to 1820, its operations there came to an end. St. Dominic (q.v.) has the credit of having invented the institution by the zeal which animated him for the orthodoxy of the Church.

Definition taken from The Nuttall Encyclopædia, edited by the Reverend James Wood (1907)

Inoculation * Insanity
Innes, Thomas (Father Innes)
Innisfail
Innocent
Innocent III.
Innocent XI.
Innocents, The Holy, Feast of
Inns of Court
Innsbruck
Ino
Inoculation
Inquisition
Insanity
Inspiration
Inspiration of the Scriptures
Inspired Idiot
Institute of France
Institutes of the Christian Religion
Intaglio
Intellect
Interlaken
International, The

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Inquisition in Brewer’s Dictionary of Phrase & Fable

Links here from Chalmers

Alard, Francis
Apuleius, Lucius
Aquaviva, Claudius
Bedell, William
Berriman, William
Bower, Archibald
Carranza, Bartholomew
Cecco D'Ascoli
Cervantes Saavedra, Miguel De
Chandler, Samuel
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