La Bruyère, Jean de

La Bruyère, Jean de, a celebrated French moralist, born at Paris; was tutor to the Duke of Bourbon, the grandson of the great Condé, and spent a great part of his life in Paris in connection with the Condé family; his most celebrated work is “Les Caractères de Théophrastus” (1687), which abounds in wise maxims and reflections on life, but gave offence to contemporaries by the personal satires in it under disguised names; he ranks high as a writer no less than as a moralist; his style is “a model of ease, grace, and fluency, without weakness in his characters; a book,” adds Professor Saintsbury, “most interesting to read, and especially to Englishmen” (1645-1696).

Definition taken from The Nuttall Encyclopædia, edited by the Reverend James Wood (1907)

Labrador * Labuan
Kyoto
Kyrie Eleison
Kyrle, John
Lab`arum
Labé, Louise
Labiche, Eugene
Lablache
Laboulaye, René de
Labourdonnais, Maré de
Labrador
La Bruyère, Jean de
Labuan
Labyrinth
Lac
Laccadives, The
Lacépède, Comte de
Lachaise, François de
Lachesis
Lachmann, Karl
Lachryma Christi
Laconia