Labyrinth

Labyrinth, a name given to sundry structures composed of winding passages so intricate as to render it difficult to find the way out, and sometimes in. Of these structures the most remarkable were those of Egypt and of Crete. The Egyptian to the E. of Lake Moeris, consisted of an endless number of dark chambers, connected by a maze of passages into which it was difficult to find entrance; and the Cretan, built by Dædalus, at the instance of Minos, to imprison the Minotaur, out of which one who entered could not find his way out again unless by means of a skein of thread. It was by means of this, provided him by Ariadne, Perseus (q.v.) found his way out after slaying the Minotaur (q.v.).

Definition taken from The Nuttall Encyclopædia, edited by the Reverend James Wood (1907)

Labuan * Lac
Kyrle, John
Lab`arum
Labé, Louise
Labiche, Eugene
Lablache
Laboulaye, René de
Labourdonnais, Maré de
Labrador
La Bruyère, Jean de
Labuan
Labyrinth
Lac
Laccadives, The
Lacépède, Comte de
Lachaise, François de
Lachesis
Lachmann, Karl
Lachryma Christi
Laconia
Lacordaire, Jean Baptiste Henry
Lacratelle

Nearby

Labyrinth in Brewer’s Dictionary of Phrase & Fable

Links here from Chalmers

Stillingfleet, Edward