Laplace

Laplace, a celebrated French mathematician, born at Beaumont-en-Auge, Normandy; the son of a farmer; after teaching in his native place went to Paris (1767), where he became professor in the Royal Military School; becoming member of the Académie des Sciences in 1785, he attained a position among mathematicians and astronomers almost equal to Newton's; his “Three Laws” demonstrated the stability of the solar system; he published many treatises on lunar and planetary problems, electricity, magnetism, and a Nebula-hypothesis; his “Mécanique Céleste” is unrivalled in that class of work; surviving the Revolution he became implicated in politics without success or credit; he received his marquisate from Louis XVIII. in 1817, when he became President of the French Academy; “Lagrange (q.v.) has proved that on Newton's theory of gravitation the planetary system would endure for ever; Laplace, still more cunningly, even guessed that it could not have been made on any other scheme” (1749-1827).

Definition taken from The Nuttall Encyclopædia, edited by the Reverend James Wood (1907)

Lapithæ * Lapland
Lansdowne, Henry, third Marquis of
Lansdowne, Henry, fifth Marquis of
Lanterne, La
Laocöon
Laodamia
Laodicea
Laomedon
Laotze
La Pérouse
Lapithæ
Laplace
Lapland
La Plata
La Plata River
Lapsi
Laputa
Lardner, Dionysius
Lardner, Nathaniel
Lares
Larissa
La Rochefoucauld, François, Duc de

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