Liverpool

Liverpool, the third city and first seaport of Great Britain, in Lancashire, on the Mersey, 3 m. from the sea, formerly the chief seat of the slave interest in Britain; owed its present prosperity to the impulse of the cotton trade at the end of the 18th century; progressing rapidly it has now docks stretching six miles along the Mersey, which receive a sixth of the tonnage that visits British ports; through it passes a third of our foreign trade, including enormous imports of wheat and cotton and exports of cotton goods; it possesses shipbuilding and engineering works, iron-foundries, flour, tobacco, and chemical factories; the public buildings, town hall, exchange, colleges, and observatory are fine edifices; it was the native place of W. E. Gladstone.

Population (circa 1900) given as 585,000.

Definition taken from The Nuttall Encyclopædia, edited by the Reverend James Wood (1907)

Liva * Liverpool, Earl of, Robert Jenkinson
Litany
Literature
Lithuania
Litmus
Little Corporal
Little Englanders
Littleton, Sir Thomas
Littré
Liturgy
Liva
Liverpool
Liverpool, Earl of, Robert Jenkinson
Liverymen
Livingstone, David
Livius, Titus (Livy)
Livonia
Livraison
Llandudno
Llanelly
Llanos
Llorente, Juan Antonio

Nearby

Liverpool in Brewer’s Dictionary of Phrase & Fable

Links here from Chalmers

Almon, John
Brereton, Owen Salusbury
Brindley, James
Burns, Robert
Capellus, Lewis
Chambers, Sir Robert
Collingwood, Cuthbert, Lord
Cook, James
Currie, James
Derrick, Samuel
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