Norway

Norway, a kingdom of North Europe, comprising the western side of the Scandinavian peninsula, and separated from Sweden on the E. by the Kjölen Mountains; the Arctic and Atlantic Oceans beat upon its long and serrated western seaboard, forcing a way up the many narrow and sinuous fiords; Sogne Fiord, the longest, runs into the heart of the country 100 m.; off the northern coast lie the Loffodens, while the Skerries skirt the E. The country forms a strip of irregular and mountainous coast-land 1160 m. long, which narrows down at its least breadth to 25 m.; 70 per cent, of the surface is uncultivable, and 24 per cent, is forest; the lakes number 30,000, of which Lake Wenner (2136 sq. m.) is the largest; immense glaciers are found in the great mountain barrier, and innumerable rivers run short and rapid courses to the Atlantic and to the Skager-Rak in the S.; the Glommen, flowing into Christiania Fiord, is the largest (400 m.). The climate of the W. coast districts is tempered by the Gulf Stream; inland there is a great decrease in the rainfall, but much intenser cold is experienced. The wealth of the country lies in its forests and fisheries, mines and shipping; only 2 per cent, of the land-surface is under cultivation, and 2.8 per cent is utilised for grazing; the copper, iron, and silver mines are declining. Christiania (the capital) is the centre of the industrial area; the shipping almost equals that of the United States, and ranks third in the world. The Norwegians are intensely democratic (titles and nobility were abolished in 1821), and although under a king, who also includes Sweden in his dominions, they enjoy democratic home rule, no members of the Storthing (Parliament) being paid. Education is free and compulsory, and the bulk of the people are Lutherans. The monetary unit is the Krone (= 1/1½). Norway, originally inhabited by Lapps and Gothic tribes, was first unified by Harold Haarfager (A.D. 863-930), and subsequently welded into a Christian kingdom by his descendant St. Olaf (1015). From 1536 it was held as a conquered province by Denmark up to 1814; in that year it was ceded to Sweden, and received national rights and a free constitution.

Population (circa 1900) given as 2,000,000.

Definition taken from The Nuttall Encyclopædia, edited by the Reverend James Wood (1907)

Norton, Mrs. * Norwich
Northampton
Northamptonshire
Northcote, James
Northcote, Sir Stafford Henry
Northmen
Northumberland
Northumbria
Northwich
Norton, Charles Edward
Norton, Mrs.
Norway
Norwich
Norwood
Nostradamus
Notables, The
Notary Public
Notre Dame
Nottingham
Nottinghamshire
Noumena
Nova Scotia

Nearby

Norway in Brewer’s Dictionary of Phrase & Fable

Links here from Chalmers

Adrian Iv., Pope
Ayscue, Sir George
Barnes, Joshua
Benbow, John
Brahe, Tycho
Bugenhagius, John
Charles Xii., King Of Sweden
Cook, James
Cronstedt, Axel Frederic
De Witt, John
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