Odin

Odin or Wodin, the chief god of the ancient Scandinavians, combined in one the powers of Zeus and Ares among the Greeks, and was attended by two black ravens—Hugin, mind, and Munin, memory, the bearers of tidings between him and the people of his subject-world. His council chamber is in Asgard (q.v.), and he holds court with his warriors in Valhalla (q.v.). He is the source of all wisdom as well as all power, and is supposed by Carlyle to have been the deification of some one who incarnated in himself all the characteristic wisdom and valour of the Scandinavian race; Frigga was his wife, and Balder and Thor his sons. See Carlyle's “Heroes.”

Definition taken from The Nuttall Encyclopædia, edited by the Reverend James Wood (1907)

Odessa * Odo
Ochino, Bernardino
Ochterlony, Sir David
Ockley, Simon
O'Connell, Daniel
Octavia
October
Od
Oddfellows
Oder
Odessa
Odin
Odo
Odoacer
O'Donnell, Leopold
Odyssey
Œcolampadius, Joannes
Œdipus
Œhlenschläger, Adam Gottlob
Oehler, Gustav
Œil-de-bœuf
Œland

Nearby

Odin in Brewer’s Dictionary of Phrase & Fable

Links here from Chalmers

Gray, Thomas
Penrose, Thomas