Pekin

Pekin, the capital of China, on a sandy plain in the basin of the Pei-ho, is divided into two portions, each separately walled, the northern or Manchu city and the southern or Chinese. The former contains the Purple Forbidden city, in which are the Imperial palaces; surrounding it is the August city, in which are a colossal copper Buddha and the Temple of Great Happiness. Outside this are the government offices, foreign legations, the temple of Confucius, a great Buddhist monastery, a Roman Catholic cathedral, and Christian mission stations. The Chinese city has many temples, mission stations, schools, and hospitals; but it is sparsely populated, houses are poor, and streets unpaved. Pekin has railway communication with Hankow, and is connected with other cities and with Russia by telegraph. Its trade and industry are inconsiderable. It is one of the oldest cities in the world. It was Kubla Khan's capital, and has been the metropolis of the empire since 1421.

Population (circa 1900) given as 1,000,000.

Definition taken from The Nuttall Encyclopædia, edited by the Reverend James Wood (1907)

Peishwah * Pelagius
Peel, Sir Robert
Peel Towers
Peele, George
Peeping Tom of Coventry
Peers, The Twelve
Pegasus
Pegu
Pei-ho
Peirce, Benjamin
Peishwah
Pekin
Pelagius
Pelasgi
Peleus
Pelew Islands
Pelham
Pelias
Pelican
Pelides
Pelion
Pelissier

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Amiot, Father
Attiret, John Denis
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Catherine Ii.
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Gaubil, Antony
Gerbillon, John Francis
Mailla, Joseph-Anne-Marie De Moyriac De
Morton, Charles
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