Phrygia

Phrygia, a country originally extending over the western shores of Asia Minor, but afterwards confined to the western uplands, where are the sources of the Hermus, Mæander, and Sangarius; was made up of barren hills where sheep famous for their wool grazed, and fertile valleys where the vine was cultivated; marble was quarried in the hills, and gold was found; several great trade roads from Ephesus crossed the country, among whose towns the names of Colosse and Laodicea are familiar; the Phrygians were an Armenian people, with a mystic orgiastic religion, and were successively conquered by Assyrians, Lydians, and Persians, falling under Rome in 43 B.C.

Definition taken from The Nuttall Encyclopædia, edited by the Reverend James Wood (1907)

Phrenology * Phrygian Cap
Phœbus
Phœnicia
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Phœnix Park
Phonograph
Photius
Photogravure
Photosphere
Phototype
Phrenology
Phrygia
Phrygian Cap
Phryné
Phtah
Phylacteries
Physiocratic School
Piacenza
Pia-mater
Piarists
Piazzi
Pibroch

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