Pompeii

Pompeii, an ancient Italian seaport on the Bay of Naples, fell into the possession of Rome about 80 B.C., and was converted into a watering-place and “the pleasure haunt of paganism”; the Romans erected many handsome public buildings, and their villas and theatres and baths were models of classic architecture and the scenes of unbounded luxury; the streets were narrow, provided with side-walks, the walls often decorated with painting or scribbled over by idle gamins; the number of shops witnesses to the fashion and gaiety of the town, the remains of painted notices to its municipal life; a terrible earthquake ruined it and drove out the inhabitants in A.D. 63; they returned and rebuilt it, however, in a tawdry and decadent style, and luxury and pleasure reigned as before till in A.D. 79 an eruption of Vesuvius buried everything in lava and ashes; the ruins were forgotten till accidentally discovered in 1748; since 1860 the city has been disinterred under the auspices of the Italian Government, and is now a favourite resort of tourists and archæologists.

Definition taken from The Nuttall Encyclopædia, edited by the Reverend James Wood (1907)

Pompadour, Marquise de * Pompey, Cneius
Polyhymnia
Polynesia
Polyphemus
Polytechnic School
Polytheism
Pombal, Marquis de
Pomerania
Pomona
Pomona
Pompadour, Marquise de
Pompeii
Pompey, Cneius
Pompey's Pillar
Ponce de Leon
Poncho
Pondicherry
Pondos
Poniatowski, Prince Joseph
Pons Asinorum
Ponsonby, Sir Frederick Cavendish
Pontefract

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Cicero, Marcus Tullius
Farnabie, Thomas
Hamilton, Sir William