Pomerania

Pomerania, a Prussian province lying between the Baltic and Brandenburg, with West Prussia on the E. and Mecklenburg on the W., is a flat and in some parts sandy country, with no hills, many lakes, and a large lagoon, the Stettiner Haff, into which the chief river, the Oder, falls; the islands of Wallin, Usedom, and Rügen belong to the province; the main industry is agriculture, principal products rye and potatoes; poultry-rearing and fishing are extensively carried on; there are shipbuilding, machine-works, sugar and chemical factories; Stettin, the capital, and Stralsund are important trading centres; a university is at Greifswald; the Slavic population embraced Christianity in the 12th century; shortly afterwards the duke joined the German Empire; after the Thirty Years' War much of the province fell to Sweden, and the whole was not finally ceded to Prussia till 1815.

Population (circa 1900) given as 1,521,000.

Definition taken from The Nuttall Encyclopædia, edited by the Reverend James Wood (1907)

Pombal, Marquis de * Pomona
Polybius
Polycarp
Polycrates
Polygnotus
Polyhymnia
Polynesia
Polyphemus
Polytechnic School
Polytheism
Pombal, Marquis de
Pomerania
Pomona
Pomona
Pompadour, Marquise de
Pompeii
Pompey, Cneius
Pompey's Pillar
Ponce de Leon
Poncho
Pondicherry
Pondos

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Adelung, John Christopher
Blankenburg, Christian Frederic De
Buddeus, John Francis
Bugenhagius, John
Catherine Ii.
Fabricius, James [No. 3]
Grotius, Hugo
Heinsius, Nicholas
Kuhnius, Joachim
Lessing, Gotthold Ephraim
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