Sardou, Victorien (b. 1831)

Sardou, Victorien, a popular French playwright, born at Paris; gave up medicine for literature, and his first successes were “Monsieur Garat” and “Les Prés Saint-Gervais,” both in 1800; from that date his popularity and wealth began to flow in upon him; his work has been taken up by Sarah Bernhardt, for whom he wrote “Fédora,” “Théodora,” and “La Tosca” (1887); a number of his plays have been translated into English, such as “A Scrap of Paper,” “Diplomacy,” &c.; was elected to the Academy in 1877; his plays are characterised by clever dialogue and stage effects, and an emotionalism rather French than English; (b. 1831).

Definition taken from The Nuttall Encyclopædia, edited by the Reverend James Wood (1907)

Sardis * Sarmatians
Saracens
Saragossa
Sarasate, Martin Meliton
Sarasvati
Saratoff
Saratoga Springs
Sara`wak
Sardanapálus
Sardinia
Sardis
Sardou, Victorien
Sarmatians
Sarpedon
Sarpi, Paul
Sarto, Andreo del
Sartor Resartus
Saskatchewan
Sassari
Satan
Satanic School
Satellites