Sicily

Sicily, the largest island in the Mediterranean, lying off the SW. extremity of Italy, to which it belongs, and from which it is separated by the narrow strait of Messina, 2 m. broad; the three extremities of its triangular configuration form Capes Faro (NE.), Passaro (S.), and Boco (W.); its mountainous interior culminates in the volcanic Etna, and numerous streams rush swiftly down the thickly-wooded valleys; the coast-lands are exceptionally fertile, growing (although agricultural methods are extremely primitive) excellent crops of wheat and barley, as well as an abundance of fruit; sulphur-mining is an important industry, and large quantities of the mineral are exported; enjoys a fine equable climate, but malaria is in parts endemic; the inhabitants are a mixed—Greek, Italian, Arabic, &c.—race, and differ considerably in language and appearance from Italians proper; are ill-governed, and as a consequence discontented and backward, even brigandage not yet being entirely suppressed. Palermo, the largest city, is situated on the precipitous N. coast. As part of the “Kingdom of the Two Sicilies,” comprising Sicily and Naples, it was overrun by Garibaldi in 1860, and in the same year was incorporated with the kingdom of Italy.

Population (circa 1900) given as 3,285,000.

Definition taken from The Nuttall Encyclopædia, edited by the Reverend James Wood (1907)

Sicilian Vespers * Sickingen, Franz von
Shropshire
Shrovetide
Shumla
Shylock
Siam
Siamese Twins
Sibbald, Sir Robert
Siberia
Sibyl
Sicilian Vespers
Sicily
Sickingen, Franz von
Sicyon
Siddons, Sarah
Sidereal Year
Sidgwick, Henry
Sidlaw Hills
Sidmouth
Sidmouth, Henry Addington, Viscount
Sidney
Sidney, Sir Philip

Nearby

Antique pictures of Sicily

Links here from Chalmers

Abrabanel, Isaac
Abulfeda, Ishmael
Acciaioli, Donato
Acron
Adria, John James
Adrian Iv., Pope
Adrian, Publius Æliuvs
Alaymo, Mark Anthony
Alberoni, Julius
Alcadinus
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