Venice

Venice, a city of Italy, in a province of the same name, at the head of the Adriatic, in a shallow lagoon dotted with some eighty islets, and built on piles partly of wood and partly of stone, the streets of which are canals traversed by gondolas and crossed here and there by bridges; the city dates from the year 432, when the islands were a place of refuge from the attacks of the Huns, and took shape as an independent State with magistrates of its own about 687, to assume at length the form of a republic and become “Queen of the Adriatic Sea,” the doge, or chief magistrate, ranking as one of the sovereign powers of the Western world; from its situation it became in the 10th century a great centre of trade with the East, and continued to be till the discovery of the route round the Cape, after which it began to decline, till it fell eventually under the yoke of Austria, from which it was wrested in 1866, and is now part of the modern kingdom of Italy, with much still to show of what it was in its palmy days, and indications of a measure of recovery from its down-trodden state; for an interesting and significant sketch in brief of its rise and fall see the “Shadow on the Dial” in Ruskin's “St. Mark's Rest.”

Definition taken from The Nuttall Encyclopædia, edited by the Reverend James Wood (1907)

Vengeur, Le * Ventnor
Vehmgerichte
Veii
Veit, Philipp
Velasquez, Diego de Silva
Vendée, La
Vendémiaire
Vendetta
Vendôme, Louise Joseph, Duc de
Venezuela
Vengeur, Le
Venice
Ventnor
Venus
Venus
Vera Cruz
Verdi, Giuseppe
Verdun
Verestchagin
Vergil, Polydore
Verigniaud
Verlaine, Paul

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Aaron, Pietro
Aaron-Hariscon
Aarsens, Francis
Abati, Antony
Abbas, Halli
Abell, John
Aben-Ezra
Abengnefit
Abiosi
Abrabanel, Isaac
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