Würtemberg

Würtemberg (2,035), a kingdom of South Germany, about one-fourth the size of Scotland, between Baden on the W. and Bavaria on the E.; the Black Forest extends along the W. of it, and it is traversed nearly E. and W. by the Swabian Alp, which slopes down on the N. side into the valley of the Neckar, and on the S. into that of the Danube; the soil is fertile, and is in great part under cultivation, yielding corn, vines, and fruits, agriculture being the chief industry of the population; there are only four towns whose inhabitants exceed 20,000, of which Stuttgart is one, and Ulm, the capital, is the other; the towns are the centres of varied manufactures; education is of a high standard; and associated with the country is a number of famous names-enough to mention the names of Kepler, Schiller, Hegel, Schelling, and Strauss; the government is constitutional, under a hereditary sovereign.

Definition taken from The Nuttall Encyclopædia, edited by the Reverend James Wood (1907)

Wurmser, Count von * Wurtz, Charles Adolphe
Wren, Sir Christopher
Wren, Matthew
Wrexham
Wright, Joseph
Wright, Thomas
Writers to the Signet
Wulstan, St.
Wundt, Wilhelm Max
Wupperthal
Wurmser, Count von
Würtemberg
Wurtz, Charles Adolphe
Würzburg
Wuttke, Karl
Wyandots
Wyatt, Richard
Wyatt, Sir Thomas
Wyatt, Sir Thomas
Wycherley, William
Wycliffe, John
Wycombe, High