Xerxes

Xerxes, a king of Persia, son of Darius I., whom he succeeded on the throne in 485 B.C.; in his ambition to subdue Greece, which, after suppressing a revolt in Egypt, he in 481 essayed to do with an immense horde of men both by sea and land, he with his army crossed the Hellespont by means of a bridge of boats, was checked for a time at Thermopylæ by Leonidas and his five hundred, advanced to Athens to see his fleet destroyed at Salamis by Themistocles, fled at the sight by the way he came, and left Mardonius with 300,000 men to carry out his purpose, but, as it happened, to suffer defeat on the fatal field of Platæa in 479, and the utter annihilation of all his hopes; the rest of his life he spent in obscurity, and he was assassinated in 465 by Artabanus, the captain of his bodyguard, after a reign of 20 years.

Definition taken from The Nuttall Encyclopædia, edited by the Reverend James Wood (1907)

Xeres * Xesibeland
Wyvern
Xanthus
Xantippe
Xavier, St. Francis
Xebec
Xenien
Xenocrates
Xenophanes
Xenophon
Xeres
Xerxes
Xesibeland
Ximenes de Cisneros, Francisco
Xingu
Xucar
Yablonoi Mountains
Yacu-mama
Yahoo
Yajur-Veda
Yaksha
Yakutsk

Nearby

Xerxes in Brewer’s Dictionary of Phrase & Fable

Links here from Chalmers

Barnes, Joshua
Bettinelli, Saverio
Crebillon, Prosper Joliot De
Diodorus Siculus
Euripides
Glover, Richard
Henley, John
Herodotus
Pindar
Sophocles
Themistocles