Zeno

Zeno, Greek philosopher, the founder of Stoic philosophy, born at Citium, in Cyprus, son of a merchant and bred to merchandise, but losing all in a shipwreck gave himself up to the study of philosophy; went to Athens, and after posing as a cynic at length opened a school of his own in the Stoa, where he taught to extreme old age a gospel called Stoicism, which, at the decline of the heathen world, proved the stay of many a noble soul that but for it would have died without sign, although it is thus “Sartor,” in the way of apostrophe, underrates it: “Small is it that thou canst trample the Earth with its injuries under thy feet, as old Greek Zeno trained thee; thou canst love the Earth while it injures thee, and even because it injures thee; for this a Greater than Zeno was needed, and he too was sent” (342-270 B.C.). See Stoics, The.

Definition taken from The Nuttall Encyclopædia, edited by the Reverend James Wood (1907)

Zeno * Zenobia
Zeit-geist
Zeitun
Zeller, Eduard
Zemindar
Zem-Zem
Zenana
Zend
Zend-Avesta
Zenith
Zeno
Zeno
Zenobia
Zephaniah
Zephon
Zephyrus
Zermatt
Zero
Zeus
Zeuss, Johann Kaspar
Zeuxis
Zidon