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, a priest of the oratory, was born at Brescia, of a noble family, Nov.

, a priest of the oratory, was born at Brescia, of a noble family, Nov. 2, 1714, and studied theology, and the Greek and Hebrew languages, in both which he became an excellent scholar. He applied himself chiefly to an investigation of the text of the sacred scriptures, and read with great care the Greek and Latin fathers. His studies were also diversified by an acquaintance with chronology, history both sacred and profane, antiquities, criticism, and whatever belongs to the character of a general scholar. In his own country, he obtained such fame that his advice was thought to be oracular. He died Dec. 30, 1779, in his sixty-fifth year. He published “Critical Reflexions” on Febronius’s work, entitled “De Statu Ecclesiae, et legitima potestate Romani Pontificis;” some dissertations and other works, particularly one on the “manner of writing the lives of illustrious characters,” with an appendix on that peculiar species of biography, writing one’s own life. He left also some unpublished works, and among them “a comparison between the Italians and French,” and “Thoughts on the life and writings of father Paul Sarpi.

priest of the oratory, born at Marseilles, in 1693, died Feb. 7, 1782,

, priest of the oratory, born at Marseilles, in 1693, died Feb. 7, 1782, at an advanced age, is less known by his having borne away the prizes for poetry, at Toulouse, at Marseilles,' and at Pau, than by his “History of the town of Rochelle, and the country of Aunis,1756, 2 vols. 4to, and in 6 vols. 12mo. This work had been long expected, and evidently cost the author much attention and labour. It is a full and complete history of one of the smallest provinces of France (according to the ancient division), by one who had spent many years in collecting and digesting his materials. The natural and civil history are treated with great ability and; precision. He may, however, he blamed, in common with many topographers, for a certain Degree of prolixity which general readers seldom can relish. His other works are “'Eloge de P. Jaillot,” 1750, 4to; “Journal Historique de la tentative* de la flotte Angloisc sur la cote d'Aunisj1757, 4to. This alludes to a well-known expedition, which few Englishmen have much pleasure in remembering. “Memoire sur la necessite de diminuer le nombre des fetes,1763, 12mo; “De Fetat de l‘agriculture chez les Romains depuis le commencement de la Republique jusqu’au siecle de Jules Caesar relativement au gouvernment, aux mceurs, et au commerce,1777, 8vo. This work, which discovers much research, and profound reflexion, was an answer to the prize questions on the subjects handled, proposed by the Academy of Inscriptions and Belles Lettres, and obtained the acccssit of that learned body. To his learning, M. Arcere is said to have joined great probity, and suavity of manners.

, brother of the preceding, and a priest of the Oratory, was born at Marseilles in 1689, gained several

, brother of the preceding, and a priest of the Oratory, was born at Marseilles in 1689, gained several academical prizes for his poetical essays, and became superior of the college of his congregation. The delicacy of his health rendering retirement necessary, he went to the chateau d'Ardenne, near Sisteron, where he passed the remainder of his days in study, and rendered himself dear to the poor of the neighbourhood by many acts of charity. He died Dec. 5, 1769. Botany was his favourite pursuit in this retirement, where he formed a garden that was eagerly visited by persons curious in rare plants and flowers; and the result of his studies appeared in the following publications, 1. “Traite de Renoncules,” Paris, 1746, 8vo. 2. “Traite des Tulipes,1760, 12mo. 3. “Traite des Oeillets,1762, 12mo. 4. “Traite des lacinthes,” 12mo. 5. “Traite de l‘Oreille d’ours,” 8vo. 6. “Lettres interessantes pour les medicins de profession, utiles aux ecclesiastiques,” Avignon, 1759, 2 vols. 12mo. 7. “Annee champetre,” Florence (really Lyons), 1769, 3 vols. 12mo. He was also editor of his brother’s posthumous works.

, a French Latin poet, was born at Chatillon in the Lower Maine, and became a priest of the Oratory at Paris, in 1659. He had considerable genius,

, a French Latin poet, was born at Chatillon in the Lower Maine, and became a priest of the Oratory at Paris, in 1659. He had considerable genius, and was much addicted to study, so that he soon became one of the best scholars and best poets of his order. When M. Fouquet, superintendant of finances, was arrested, he published a Latin poem, entitled “Fuquetius in vinculis,” which was much applauded. He published another poem at Troyes in 1668, the title of which was, “In tabellas excellentissiim pictoris du Wernier, ad nobilem et eximium virum Eustachium Quinot, apud quern illae visuntur Trecis, carmen.” Father Bahier translated this production afterwards into French verse, under the title of “Peinture poctique des tableaux de mignature de M. Quinot, faits par Joseph de Werner.” At the time he taught rhetoric at Marseilles, in 1670, he delivered and published an oration on Henrietta of England, duchess of Orleans, and the same year printed a Latin poem of six hundred verses in praise of Toussaint Fourbin de Janson, bishop of Marseilles. He wrote some other pieces, which were less known; such was Uis reputation, however, that he was chosen secretary of the Oratory, an office which he filled with great credit for thirty years his latter days were distinguished by many acts of ciiarity, and it was during his attendance on a dying friend that he caught a disorder, which proved fatal in the month of April 1707.

, nephew of the preceding, priest of the oratory of St. Philip de Neri, was also a learned antiquary.

, nephew of the preceding, priest of the oratory of St. Philip de Neri, was also a learned antiquary. He was born at Verona Sept. 9, 1704, the son of John Baptist, brother to Francis Bianchini, and was educated under the eye of his uncle in the college of Montefiascone. Before 1725, he was promoted to a canonry in the cathedral, and a prebendal stall in St. Luke, and was soon after appointed librarian to the chapter: but in 1732 he resigned that and his benefices, and entered into the congregation of the oratory at Rome, where he divided his time between the pious duties of that order, and his literary researches, particularly in what related to history and ecclesiastical antiquities. His first publication was, 1. The fourth and concluding volume of his uncle’s edition of Anastasius Bibliothecarius, Rome, 1735, fol. 2. “Viridiciae canonicarum Scripturarum vulgatse Latinoe editionis,” Rome, 1740, fol. This volume, the only one published, was to have been followed by six others, the plan of which is sketched in the preface, which, with the preliminary dissertations, contains the history of all the different books of the bible, the manuscript copies in various libraries, the translations, &c. 3. “Evangeliarum quadruplex Latinse versionis antiquoe, seu veteris Italicte, nunc primum in lucem editum ex codd. Mss. aureis, argenteis, &c. aliisque plusquam millenariae antiquitatis,” Rome, 1749, fol. This may be considered as a part of the preceding. 4. “Demonstratio historiae ecclesiasticse quadripartitae monumentis ad fidem temporum et gestorum,” ibid, 1752, fol. A second volume was afterwards published of this elegant collection of fragments of antiquity, inscriptions, medals, vases, &c. found in the different churches, cemeteries, and museums of Rome, or elsewhere, beautifully engraven, and accompanied with explanations and chronological tables. It extends, however, no farther than the first two centuries of the Christian iera. 5. “Delle porte e mura di Roma, con illustrazioni,” ibid. 1747, 4to. 6. “Parere sopra la cagione della morte della sig. contessa Cornelia Zangari, esposto in una lettera,” Verona, 1731, and an improved edition, Rome, 1743, 8vo. This curious dissertation relates to a lady of rank who was found in her room reduced to ashes, except her head, legs, and one of her fingers. As this could not be ascribed to external fire, the room being no wise damaged, it excited much attention, and gave rise to a variety of opinions. Bianchini maintains in this tract, that it was the effect of an internal and spontaneous fire occasioned by the excessive use of camphorated brandy, to which the lady had been much addicted. The time of Bianchini’s death is not mentioned.

, but he did not live to put the finishing hand to the work, which was published by John Severani, a priest of the oratory. Father Aringhi, another of the oratory, translated

, and the inheritor of his property, was educated by him, studied law, and by his uncle’s interest was appointed agent to the order of Malta. He was a very little man, of a dark countenance, resembling that of his mother, who had been an African slave, whom his father married. In his youth he was very wild, but reformed, lest his uncle should disinherit him, and addicted himself to the study of antiquities, producing the “Roma Sottefanea,” Rome, 1632, fol. a description of the tombs and the epitaphs of the early Christians which are found in the catacombs at Rome. For this purpose he investigated them with great care, often remaining five or six days together under ground, but he did not live to put the finishing hand to the work, which was published by John Severani, a priest of the oratory. Father Aringhi, another of the oratory, translated and published it in Latin, 1651, 2 vols. fol. an edition in more request than the original, and more full and correct.

, a French biographer, descended from an honourable family in Provence, was a priest of the oratory, and born at Aix in 1680, where he was also educated.

, a French biographer, descended from an honourable family in Provence, was a priest of the oratory, and born at Aix in 1680, where he was also educated. The love of a retired life induced him to become a member of the congregation of the oratory, where he taught the belles lettres with fame and success, and filled the several posts of his profession with great credit. Happening to be at Marseilles during the plague in 1719 and 1720, he risked his life in administering relief to the diseased. He appears to have been in that city also in 1726, but some time after came to Paris, where he passed his life in the house belonging to his order, in high esteem with all who knew him. He died of a stroke of apoplexy, March 19, 1753. Just before his death he had prepared for the press his lives of the illustrious men of Provence, which was to have formed four volume?, 4to, and was to be published by subscription, but we do not find that the scheme was carried into execution by his friends. During his life he published in the literary journals, various memoirs of eminent men, and, in separate publications, the Life of Gassendi, Paris, 1737, of John Peter Gibert, ibid. 1737, 12mo; and apart of his great work, under the title of “Memoires pour servir a l'histoire des homines illustres de Provence,” ibid. 1752, 12mo, containing fourteen lives.

, a French priest of the oratory, who made considerable approaches to liberality

, a French priest of the oratory, who made considerable approaches to liberality and good sense in his writings, was born at Brignolle, in the diocese of Aix in Provence, in 1661, and became celebrated for his knowledge of ecclesiastical history and antiquities; on which subjects he lectured in the seminary of St. Magloire, at Paris, for thirteen years. His first publication appears to have been against the illusion of the divining rod; “Lettres pour prouver l'illusion des philosophes sur la baguette,” Paris, 1693, reprinted in 1702, with many additions, under the title of “Histoire critique des pratiques superstitieuses, &c.” Of this there was a new edition in 3 vols. 12mo, 1732, with a life of the author by M. Bellon, his nephew, and in 1737 the abbe Granet printed a collection of pieces intended as a fourth volume. He also wrote against the theatre, as an amusement improper for Christians; but his more elaborate work was that on “Liturgies,” published in 4 vols. 8vd, containing a history of liturgies, prayers, ceremonies, &c. including those of the church of England. This, owing to some liberal opinions, involved him in a controversy, in which he defended himself with great ability, but before the contest was over he died, Jan. 6, 1729.

, of Aix, was a celebrated priest of the oratory, who taught the canon law at Avignon, and died

, of Aix, was a celebrated priest of the oratory, who taught the canon law at Avignon, and died September 25, 1685, at Aix, aged eighty one. His chief works are: “Juris Canonici theoria, et praxis,” a new edition of which was published by M. Gibert, 1738, foL with notes; an " Account of the Ecclesiastical History of the Councils and Canons,*' in Latin, the best edition of which is 1680, fol. In the edition of 1670, 8vo, are some Dissertations not to be found in that of 1680. Few ecclesiastics have been more praised for excellence of private character than Cabassut.

priest of the oratory, famous for his sermons, was born in 1599 at

, priest of the oratory, famous for his sermons, was born in 1599 at Vire in Normandy. He first studied at Caen, put himself under the direction of cardinal de Bemlle, and entered into his congregation. He afterwards devoted himself to the study of the Holy Scriptures and the fathers, and became a very celebrated, preacher. He was sent to Rome to defend the doctrine of Jansenius; where he pronounced a discourse on that subject before Innocent X. which may be seen in the “Journal de Saint-Amour.” His attachment to the opinions of Jangenius was the cause or the pretext of search being made after him in order to convey him to the Bastille, but he escaped the pursuit, and retired for the rest of his days to the seat of the duke de Liancourt, in the diocese of Beauvais. One day, when Louis XIV. happened to be there, the duke presented Desmares to him. The old man said to the monarch, with an air of respect and freedom: “Sir, I ask a boon of you.” “Ask,” returned Louis, “and I will grant it you.” “Sir,” replied the old man, “permit me to put on my spectacles, that I may contemplate the countenance of my king.” Louis XIV. declared that of all the variety of compliments that had been paid him, none ever pleased him more than this. Desmares died in 1687, at the age of 87, after having composed the “Necrologe de Port-royal,” printed in 1723, 4to, to which a supplement was added by Le Fevre de St. Marc, in 1725; “Description de Tabbaye de la Trappe,” Lyons, 1683, and various theological and controversial works, enumerated by Moreri.

, a learned priest of the oratory, was born December 9, 1649, at Montbrison, the

, a learned priest of the oratory, was born December 9, 1649, at Montbrison, the son of Claude Duguet, king’s advocate in the presidial of that city. Having entered the congregation of the oratory at Paris, in 1667, he taught philosophy at Troyes, and was afterwards recalled to St. Magloir, at Paris, where he gained great reputation, as professor of divinity, by his “Ecclesiastical Conferences.” Ill health obliged him to resign all his employments in 1680, and in 1685 he quitted the oratory, and retired to M. Arnauld, at Brussels; but returned to Paris afterwards, where he lived in a very retired manner, at the house of M. the president de Menars, 1690, where he continued till the death of that magistrate and his wife. He was afterwards frequently forced to change his dwelling and country, in consequence of his opposition to the Constitution Unigenitus. He was successively in Holland, at Troyes, Paris, &c. and died in the last-named city October 25, 1733, aged eighty-four. His works are numerous, and well written in French. The principal are, 1. “Lettres de Piete et de Morale,” 9 vols, 12mo; 2. “La Conduite d'une Dame Chretienne,” 12mo; 3. “Traite de la Priere publique, et des Saints Mysteres,” 12mo; 4. “Traite dogmatique sur l‘Eucharistie, sur les Exorcismes, et sur l’Usure.” The three last are much admired by Catholics, and are printed together, 1727; 12mo; 5. “Commentaires sur l'Ouvrage des 6 jours.” 12mo; 6. “Sur Job,” 3 tom, in 4 vols. 12mo; 7. “Sur la Genese,” 6 vols. 12mo; 8. “Explication sur les Pseaumes,” 5 tom. in 8 vols. 12mo; 9. “Explication des Rois, Esdras, et Nehemias,” 6 tom. in 7 vols. 12mo; 10. “Explication du Cantique des Cantiques, et de la Sagesse,” 2vols. 12mo; 11. “Explication sur Isaïe, Jonas, et Habacuc,” 6 tom. in 7 vols. 12mo; 12. “Regles pour l‘Intelligence de l’Ecriture Sainte,” 12mo. The preface to this work is by M. d'Asfeld. 13. “Explication du Mystere de la Passion de N. S. J. C.” 9 tom. in 14 vols. 12mo; 14. “Les Characters de la Charité,” 12mo; 15. “Traité des Principes de la Foi Chretienne,” 3 vols. 12mo; 16. “De l‘Education d’un Prince,” 4to, or in 4 vols. 12mo; 17. “Conferences Ecclesiastiques,” 2 vols. 4to; 18. “Je sus crucifié,” 1 vol. or 2 vols. 12mo; and some other pieces, which procured him considerable reputation while works of piety remained popular in France. The history, and an analysis of his work on the education of a prince, may be seen in our third authority.

at Lyons, in 1684, in eight volumes 12mo. The Life of Gassendi, accurately written by Bougerelle, a priest of the oratory, was published at Paris in 1737.

His large and valuable library, together with his astronomical and philosophical apparatus, was purchased by the emperor Ferdinand III. and afterwards deposited, with other choice collections, in the imperial library at Vienna. The edition of his "works above mentioned contains the philosophy and life of Epicurus the author’s own philosophy; his astronomical works the lives of Peiresc, Copernicus, Tycho Brahe, Pnrbach, Regiomontanus, John Muller, &c. a refutation of the Meditations of Des Cartes; Epistles; and other treatises. Bernier, a celebrated Freuch physician, has given an accurate view of the philosophy of Gassendi in his abridgment of it, published in French at Lyons, in 1684, in eight volumes 12mo. The Life of Gassendi, accurately written by Bougerelle, a priest of the oratory, was published at Paris in 1737.

, a learned priest of the Oratory, was born at Mans in 1640; and educated among

, a learned priest of the Oratory, was born at Mans in 1640; and educated among the religious of the congregation of the oratory at Paris, and at Saumuc From 1661 to 1667, he taught the classics and the belles lettres, and in the latter of these years he was ordained priest. He taught philosophy at Sauimir and at Angers, till 1676, when he was deprived of his professorship for being a Cartesian, and his enemies having obtained a lettre de cachet agains^t him, he was banished to Grenoble, where cardinal le Camus had established a seminary, for the education of ecclesiastics^ and having a great esteem for Lami, appointed him professor of divinity. He died January 29, 1715, at Rouen. He left many valuable works: the principal are, “Les Elemens de Geometric, et de Mathematiques,” 2 vols. 12mo; “Un Trait de Perspective,1700, 8vo; “Entretiens sur lea Sciences, et sur la Methode d'Etudier,1706, 12mo; an introduction to the Holy Scriptures, entitled “Appa* ratus Biblicus,” 4to. The abbe de Bellegarde has translated it under the title of “Apparat de la Bible,” 8vo, and there is an English translation, by Bundy, in 4to, with fine plates, Lond. 1723, 4to. He published also a valuable work, the labour of thirty years, entitled, “De Tabernaculo foederis, de Sancta Civitate Jerusalem, et de Templo ejus,” folio; “Demonstration, ou Preuves eVidentes de la Vérite et Sainted de la Morale Chretienne,1706 to 1711, 5 vols. 12 mo. He wrote also several works concerning the time in which our Saviour kept the passover, &c. the largest of which is his “Harmonia sive concordia Evangelii,” &c. Lyons, 1699, 2 vols. 4to with a Commentary, and a Geographical and Chronological Dissertation. He asserts in this work, that John the Baptist was imprisoned twice; that Christ did not eat the paschal lamb, nor celebrate the passover at his last supper; and that Mary Magdalen, and Mary the sister of Lazarus, were the same person; which three opinions involved him in a long series of disputes with many among the learned. Pere Lami also left “A System of Rhetoric,1715, 12mo; “Reflexions sur l'Art Poetique,” 12mo; “Traite de Mechanique, de PEquilibre,1687, 12ino, &c. It "was Lami’s practice to travel on foot, and he composed his Elements of Geometry and Mathematics in a journey from Grenoble to Paris, as cardinal Quirini assures us in his Memoirs.

, a native of Paris, and learned priest of the Oratory, was esteemed well acquainted with philosophy,

, a native of Paris, and learned priest of the Oratory, was esteemed well acquainted with philosophy, mathematics, and divinity. He made a considerable stay in Italy, where he acquired the respect of the literati, and was sometime superior of his congregation at Vendome. He died in an advanced age at Lyons, May 5, 1710. His works are, a Summary of the Councils, printed at Lyons 1706, in two volumes, folio, under the title “Delectus actorum Ecclesiae universalis, seu nova Summa^Conciliorum,” &c. The second volume is nearly half filled with notes on the councils, and valuable remarks on the method, mechanics, and music of Descartes, who was his friend. He'.left also some manuscripts. It is said, that he was in possession of several pieces by Clemangis and Theophylact, which have never been printed.

, a French divine, successively priest of the oratory, doctor of the Sorbonne, and abbe* of Chambon,

, a French divine, successively priest of the oratory, doctor of the Sorbonne, and abbe* of Chambon, was born at Montpellier in 1666. He was some time at the head of an ecclesiastical seminary, under Colbert, bishop of Montpellier where he was of infinite service, not only by the excellence of his instructions, but the purity of his example. He was vicar of St. Roch at Paris, in 161)2, and had there the credit of contributing to the penitence of the celebrated La Fontaine, of which the English reader may see his own curious account in the “New Memoirs of Literature,” vol. X. His latter days were passed at Paris, in the religious house of St. Magloire, where he died in 1723, at the age of fiftyseven.“Father Pouget was the author of some works, of which the most remarkable is,” The Catechism of Montpellier/ 1 the best edition of which is that of Paris in 1702, in 4to. It is a kind of body of divinity, and has been considered by the clergy of his communion as the most precise, clear, and elegantly simple statement of the doctrines and practices of religion that has ever been produced. He was concerned in some other works, which were not entirely his own such as “The Breviary of Narbonne” " Martinay’s edition of St. Jerom Montfaucon’s Greek Analects and a book of instructions for the Knights of Malta.

priest of the oratory, son of a Serjeant at Chalons-sur-Saone, was

a priest of the oratory, son of a Serjeant at Chalons-sur-Saone, was born in 1648. He went to Paris early in life, and, having finished his studies there, entered into the service of father Malebranche, who, finding he had a genius for the sciences, taught him mathematics, in which the young pupil made so rapid a progress, that, at the age of seventeen he published the first edition of his “Elemens de Mathematiques.” In the same year, 1675, he entered the congregation of the oratory, and taught mathematics with distinguished reputation, particularly at Angers. He died June 8, 1690, at Mechlin. The best edition of his “Elements,” is that of 1689, 2 vols. 4to. They contain many curious problems.

note in France, was the eldest of the four sons of Peter Terrasson, a lawyer of Lyons, and became a priest of the oratory, preacher to the king, and afterwards preacher

, the first of a literary family of considerable note in France, was the eldest of the four sons of Peter Terrasson, a lawyer of Lyons, and became a priest of the oratory, preacher to the king, and afterwards preacher to the court of Lorrain. His pulpit services were much applauded, and attended by the most crowded congregations. His exertions during Lent in the metropolitan church at Paris threw him into an illness of which he died April 25, 1723. His “Sermons” were printed in 1726, 4 vols. 12mo, and reprinted in 1736.