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Beam

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Thrown on my beam-ends. Driven to my last shift. A ship is said to be on her beam-ends when she is laid by a heavy gale completely on her beams or sides. Not unfrequently the only means of righting her in such a case is to cut away her masts.

On the starboard beam. A distant point out at sea on the right-hand side, and at right angles to the keel.

On the port beam. A similar point on the left-hand side.

On the weather beam. On that side of a ship which faces the wind.

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Bayle
Bayonet
Bayonets
Bead (Anglo-Saxon, bed, a prayer)
Bead-house
Bead-roll
Beadle
Beadsman or Bedesman
Beak
Beaker
Beam
Beam (of a stag)
Bean
Beans
Bean Feast
Bean Goose (The)
Bean-king (The)
Bear (A)
Bear (The)
Bear (To)
Bear of Bradwardine (The)

See Also:

Beam