- skip - Brewer’s

Last. (Anglo-Saxon lást, a footstep, a shoemaker’s last.)

The cobbler should stick to his last (“Ne sutor ultra crepʹidam”). Apelles having executed a famous painting, exposed it to public view, when a cobbler found fault because the painter had made too few latchets to the goloshes. Apelles amended the fault, and set out his picture again. Next day the cobbler complained of the legs, when Apelles retorted, “Keep to the shop, friend, but do not attempt to criticise what you do not understand.” (See Wigs.)

previous entry · index · next entry

ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ

Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

previous entry · index · next entry

Larder
Larēs
Large
Larigot
Lark
Larks
Larry Dugan’s Eye-water
Lars
Larvæ
Lascar
Last. (Anglo-Saxon lást, a footstep, a shoemaker’s last.)
Last Man (The)
Last Man
Last Words
Last of the Fathers
Last of the Goths
Last of the Greeks
Last of the Knights
Last of the Mohicans
Last of the Romans
Last of the Tribunes (The)

Linking here:

Roman (The)