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Breeze

.

House-sweepings, as fluff, dust, ashes, and so on, thrown as refuse into the dust-bin. We generally limit the meaning now to small ashes and cinders used for coals in burning bricks. The word is a corruption of the French, débris (rubbish, or rather the part broken or rubbed off by wear, tear, and stress of weather). The French, braise, older form brese, means small coke or charcoal.

The Breeze-fly. The gad-fly; so called from its sting. (Anglo-Saxon, briose; Gothic, bry, a sting.)

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Break up Housekeeping (To)
Break with One (To)
Breakers Ahead
Breaking a Stick
Breast
Breath
Breathe
Brèche de Roland
Breeches
Breeches Bible
Breeze
Breeze
Breidablik [wide-shining]
Brennus
Brent
Brent-goose (A)
Brent-hill
Brentford
Bressommer
Bretwalda (ruler of Britain)
Brevet Rank