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Buphagos

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Pausanias (viii. 24) tells us that the son of Japhet was called Buphagos (glutton), as Hercules was called Adephagus, because on one occasion he ate a whole ox (Athenœos x.). The French call the English “Beefeaters,” because they are eaters of large joints of meat, and not of delicate, well-dressed viands. Neither of these has any relation to our Yeomen of the Guards. (See Beefeaters, page 115.)

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Bundle of Sticks
Bundschuh [highlows]
Bung
Bungalow (Indian)
Bungay
Bungay
Bunkum
Bunny
Bunsby (Jack)
Bunting
Buphagos
Burbon
Burchardise
Burchell (Mr.)
Burd (Helen)
Burden of a Song
Bure
Bureaucracy
Burglar [burg-larron]
Burgundian
Burial of an Ass

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Beefeaters