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Large

.

To sail large is to sail on a large wind—i.e. with the wind not straight astern, but what sailors call “abaft the beam.”

Set at large, i.e. at liberty. It is a French phrase; prendre le large is to stand out at sea, or occupy the main ocean, so as to be free to move. Similarly, to be set at large is to be placed free in the wide world.

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Laprel
Lapsus Linguæ (Latin)
Laputa
Lapwing (The)
Lar Familiaris (plu. Lares familiares)
Lara
Larboard
Larceny
Larder
Larēs
Large
Larigot
Lark
Larks
Larry Dugan’s Eye-water
Lars
Larvæ
Lascar
Last. (Anglo-Saxon lást, a footstep, a shoemaker’s last.)
Last Man (The)
Last Man