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Canʹopy

properly means a gnat curtain. Herodʹotus tells us (ii. 95) that the fishermen of the Nile used to lift their nets on a pole, and form thereby a rude sort of tent under which they slept securely, as gnats will not pass through the meshes of a net. Subsequently the tester of a bed was so called, and lastly the canopy borne over kings. (Greek, κωνωψ, a gnat; κωνωπειoν a gnat-curtain; Latin, conõpēum, a gnatcurtain.)

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Canon Law
Canonical
Canonical Dress
Canonical Epistles
Canonical Hours
Canonical Obedience
Canonical Punishments
Canonicals
Canopic Vases
Canopus
Canopy
Canossa
Cant
Cantabrian Surge
Cantāte Sunday
Canteen
Canterbury
Canterbury Tales
Canting Crew (The)
Canucks
Canvas