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Canterbury Tales

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Chaucer supposed that he was in company with a party of pilgrims going to Canterbury to pay their devotions at the shrine of Thomas à Becket. The party assembled at an inn in Southwark, called the Tabard, and there agreed to tell one tale each, both in going and returning. He who told the best tale was to be treated with a supper on the homeward journey. The work is incomplete, and we have none of the tales told on the way home.

A Canterbury Tale. A cock-and-bull story; a romance. So called from Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales.

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Canonicals
Canopic Vases
Canopus
Canopy
Canossa
Cant
Cantabrian Surge
Cantāte Sunday
Canteen
Canterbury
Canterbury Tales
Canting Crew (The)
Canucks
Canvas
Canvas City (A)
Caora
Cap
Cap (the verb)
Cap Verses (To)
Cap and Bells
Cap and Feather Days

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Canterbury Tales