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Comedy

means a village-song (Greek, komē-õdē), referring to the village merry-makings, in which comic songs still take a conspicuous place. The Greeks had certain festal processions of great licentiousness, held in honour of Dionyʹsos, in the suburbs of their cities, and termed koʹmoi or village-revels. On these occasions an ode was generally sung, and this ode was the foundation of Greek comedy. (See Tragedy.)

The Father of comedy. Aristophʹanës, the Athenian (B.C. 444–380).

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Come to an End
Come to the Hammer
Come to the Heath
Come to the Point
Come to the Scratch
Come to the Worst
Come Under (To)
Come Up
Come Upon the Parish (To)
Come Yorkshire over One (To)
Comedy
Comes
Comet Wine
Coming Round
Command Night
Commandment
Comme il Faut
Commendam
Commendation Ninepence
Commis-voyageur (A)
Committee

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Tragedy