- skip - Brewer’s

Merry

.

The original meaning is not mirthful, but active, famous; hence gallant soldiers were calledmerry men;” favourable weather, “merry weather;” brisk wind, “a merry gale;” London was “merry London;” England, “merry England;” Chaucer speaks of the “merry organ at the mass;” Jane Shore is called by Pennant the “merry concubine of Edward IV.” (Anglo-Saxon, mœra, illustrious, great, mighty, etc.). (See Merry-men.)

ʹTis merry in hall, when beards wag all (2 Henry IV., act V. 3). It is a sure sign of mirth when the beards of the guests shake with laughter.

previous entry · index · next entry

ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ

Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

previous entry · index · next entry

Merlin Chair (A)
Merlo or Melo (Juan de)
Mermaids
Mermaid’s Glove [Chalina oculata]
Mermaids Purses
Meropē
Merops Son or A son of Merops
Merovingian Dynasty
Merrie England
Merrow
Merry
Merry Andrew
Merry Dancers
Merry Dun of Dover
Merry Men (My)
Merry Men of Mey
Merry Monarch
Merry-thought
Merry as a Cricket, or as a Lark, or as a Grig
Merse
Mersenne

Linking here:

Merrie England
Similes