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Denaʹrius

.

A Roman silver coin, equal in value to ten ases (deni-ases). The word was used in France and England for the inferior coins, whether silver or copper, and for ready money generally. Now d (denarius) stands for money less than a shilling, as £ s. d.

“The denarius … . shown to our Lord … . was the tribute-money by the Jews to the Roman emperor, and must not be confounded with the tribute paid to the Temple.”—F. H. Madden: Jewish Coinage, chap. xi. p. 247.

Denarius Dei [God’s penny]. An earnest of a bargain, which was given to the church or poor.

Denarii St. Petri [Peter’s pence]. One penny from each family, given to the Pope.

Denarius tertius comitaʹtus. One-third of the pence of the county, which was paid to the earl. The other two-thirds belonged to the Crown. (See D.)

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Democracy
Democritos
Demodocos
Demogorgon
Demon of Matrimonial Unhappiness
Demos (King)
Demosthenēs Lantern
Demurrage
Demy
Den
Denarius
Denizen
Dennis (John)
Dénouement
Denys (St.)
Deo Gratias (Latin)
Deo Juvante (Latin)
Deo, non Fortunâ (Latin)
Deo Volente
Deodand
Depart

See Also:

Denarius