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Diʹadem

meant, originally, a fillet wound round the head. The diadem of Bacchus was a broad band, which might be unfolded so as to make a veil. Hieronymus, king of Syracuse (B.C. 216–215), wore a diadem. Constantine the Great (306–337) was the first of the Roman emperors who wore a diadem. After his time it was set with rows of pearls and precious stones. (Greek, dia-deo, to bind entirely.)

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Devils (in Dante’s Divine Comedy):
Devonshire
Devonshire Poet
Dew-beaters
Dew-bit (A)
Dew-drink
Dexterity
Dgellabæan
Dhuldul
Diable (Le)
Diadem
Dialectics
Diamond
Diamond (Newton’s favourite little dog)
Diamond Hammer (A)
Diamond Jousts (The)
Diamond Necklace (The) (1785)
Diamond Sculls (The)
Diana
Diana of Ephesus
Dian’s Worshippers