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Divus

in Latin, attached to a proper name, does not mean divine, but simply deceased or canonised; excellently translated in Notes and Queries (May 21st, 1892, p. 421), “of blessed memory.” Thus, Divus Augustus means Augustus of blessed memory, not divine Augustus. Of course, the noun “divus” opposite to a proper noun = a god, as in Horace, 3 Odes v. 2, “Prœsens divus habebitur Augustus.” While living, Augustus will be accounted a god. Virgil (Ecl. i. 6) says, “Deus nobis hæc otia fecit;” the “deus” was Augustus.

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Divine (The)
Divine Doctor
Divine Pagan (The)
Divine Plant (The)
Divine Speaker (The)
Divining Rod
Divinity in Odd Numbers
Divino Lodovico
Division
Divorcement
Divus
Dixie Land
Dizzy
Djinnestan
Do
Do (to rhyme with go)
Do for
Do up (To)
Doab (Indian)
Dobbin
Dobbins (Humphrey)