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Do

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A contraction of ditto, which is the Italian détto (said), Latin dictus.

How do you do? i.e. How do you fare? It should be, How do you du! (Anglo-Saxon, dug-an = valēre); in Latin, Quomodo vales.

Well to do. This, again, is not the transitive verb (facĕre) but the intransitive verb (valēre), and means “well to fare.” (Anglo-Saxon, dug-an = valēre.)

To do him, i.e. cheat or trick a person out of something.

I have done the Jew, i.e. over-reached him. The same as outdo = excel.

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Divine Speaker (The)
Divining Rod
Divinity in Odd Numbers
Divino Lodovico
Division
Divorcement
Divus
Dixie Land
Dizzy
Djinnestan
Do
Do (to rhyme with go)
Do for
Do up (To)
Doab (Indian)
Dobbin
Dobbins (Humphrey)
Dobby’s Walk
Docetes
Dock-Alfar
Dock-side Lumper (A)

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