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Excheqʹuer

.

Court of Exchequer. In the subdivision of the court in the reign of Edward I., the Exchequer acquired a separate and independent position. Its special duty was to order the revenues of the Crown and recover the king’s debts. It was denominated Scaccaʹrium, from scaccum (a chess-board), and was so called because a chequered cloth was laid on the table of the court. (Madox: History of the Exchequer.)

Foss, in his Lives of the Judges, gives a slightly different explanation. He says: “All round the table was a standing ledge four fingers broad, covered with a cloth bought in the Easter Term, and this cloth was ‘black rowed with strekes about a span, like a chess-board. On the spaces of this cloth counters were arranged, marked for checking computations.ʹ”

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Ex Uno Omnes
Exaltation
Exaltation of the Cross
Examination
Examiners (Public)
Excalibur (Ex cal [ce] liber [atus])
Excellency (His)
Excelsior
Exception
Exceptions prove the Rule
Exchequer
Excise
Exclusion
Excommunication
Excruciate
Excuse
Exeat (Latin, he may go out)
Execrate
Exequatur
Exercises
Exeter