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Fleet Street (London)

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For 200 years after the Conquest London was watered on the west by “the river of Wells,” afterwards called “Fleet dyke, because (Stowe says) it runneth past the Fleete.” In the middle of the city and falling into the Thames was Wellbrooke; on the east side, Langbourne; and in the western suburbs, Oldbourne. Along the Fleete and Oldbourne “ships” used to ply with merchandise. These four, together with the Roding, the Lea, the Ravensbourne, and the Wandle, now serve as sewers to the great metropolis.

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Entry taken from Dictionary of Phrase and Fable, edited by the Rev. E. Cobham Brewer, LL.D. and revised in 1895.

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Flea-bite
Flea’s Jump
Fleance
Flèche
Flecknoe (Richard)
Fledgeby
Flee the Falcon (To)
Fleeced
Fleet Book Evidence
Fleet Marriages
Fleet Street (London)
Fleet of the Desert
Flemish Account
Flemish School
Flesh and Blood
Flesh-pots
Fleshed
Fleshly School (The)
Fleta
Fleur-de-Luce
Fleurs-de-Lys